Thursday, February 25, 2016

Engendering Transitional Justice: Silence, Absence & Repair

This special issue of Human Rights Review edited by Olivera Simic grew out of a two-day symposium held in Coolangatta, Australia, in November 2014, organised by the Socio-Legal Centre, Griffith Law School, Griffith University, Australia. As Simic writes "The symposium brought together experts concerned with transitional justice studies to consider new ways in which gender needs be rethought and perhaps reinterpreted, in the context of societies that deal with massive human rights abuse. The symposium was an intense and close engagement, where scholars from the fields of human rights, transitional justice, anthropology, psychology, and peace and conflict studies presented their work and received constructive feedback from their colleagues. Five papers that were part of the symposium proceedings are featured in this special issue, covering a broad spectrum of interrelated topics, and highlighting debates in the field of transitional justice that are often overlooked and underdeveloped in the literature. In accordance with the theme of the symposium, the articles in this special issue are unified by the topic of ‘Engendering Transitional Justice’ and the crosscutting themes of ‘Silence, Absence and Repair’".

  • Editor Note: Engendering Transitional Justice: Silence, Absence and Repair (Olivera Simic)
  • There Is a Crack in Everything: Problematising Masculinities, Peacebuilding and Transitional Justice (Brandon Hamber)
  • Gendered Narratives: Stories and Silences in Transitional Justice (Elisabeth Porter)
  • After the Truth Commission: Gender and Citizenship in Timor-Leste (Lia Kent)
  • Engendering Transitional Justice: a Transformative Approach to Building Peace and Attaining Human Rights for Women (Wendy Lambourne, Vivianna Rodriguez Carreon)
  • Feminist Research in Transitional Justice Studies: Navigating Silences and Disruptions in the Field (Olivera Simic)

Download or view the Special Issue